Latin American Agreement Psc

Latin American Agreement Psc

Category : Uncategorized

In order to facilitate the coordination of COPS activities, IMO has encouraged the establishment of regional COPS organizations and agreements. Several Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) are currently being drafted between the regions, including: nine regional agreements on port state control – Memorandums of Understanding or Memorandums of Understanding – have been signed: Europe and the North Atlantic (Paris MoU); Asia and the Pacific (Tokyo MoU); Latin America (Acuerdo de Via del Mar); Caribbean; West and Central Africa (Abuja MoU); Black Sea region (Black Sea); Mediterranean (Mediterranean) Indian Ocean (Indian Ocean); Riyadh MoU. The U.S. Coast Guard maintains the tenth PSC regime. These inspections were originally designed as a delivery state implementation, but experience has shown that they can be extremely effective. The Organization adopted Resolution A.682 (17) on regional cooperation in ship control and spills to promote regional agreements. A ship travelling to a port will normally visit other countries in the region and can therefore be more effective if inspections can be closely coordinated to focus on vessels that do not meet the standards and to avoid multiple inspections. The importance of the CSP is now recognized by most countries in the world. Regional cooperation between port states has resulted in the conclusion of Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) to promote and implement a more effective CSP for a given region. The first such agreement was signed in Paris in 1982. Since then, nine regions of the world have concluded agreements on the implementation of COPS regimes, as summarized in the table below (only Member States are mentioned). This will ensure control of as many vessels as possible, while preventing vessels from being delayed by unnecessary inspections. The primary responsibility for ship standards rests with the flag state, but port state control provides a “safety net” for capturing substandard vessels.

Inspections are aimed at vessels of greatest concern and/or most likely to be underestimated on the basis of identified risk factors. Port State Control (PSC) is a country inspection system to inspect foreign vessels in port, with the exception of those in the flag state, and take action against non-compliant vessels. PSC inspectors are called PSC officers (PSC) and must verify compliance with the requirements of international conventions such as SOLAS, MARPOL, STCW and MLC. Inspections may consist of verifying that the vessel is being dressed and operated in accordance with applicable international law and verifying the competence of the ship`s master and officers, as well as the condition and equipment of the vessel. [2] www.classnk.or.jp/hp/en/activities/portal/psc-intelligence.html (PrimeShip-PSC Intelligence) The action options that a PSCO may impose on a vessel with defects (in order of ascending gravity) are:[13] We provide assistance, information and PSC business training to prepare them for inspections – and we are always on your side. -All monthly downloads of PSC information will no longer be available from April 1, 2019. From April 1, 2019, past and up-to-date PSC information will be available for download from PrimeShip-PSC Intelligence. For more information on PrimeShip-PSC intelligence, please visit the following website: Reports from the previous six workshops are available on IMODOCS under “Meeting documents/others/PSCWS.” When applying the relevant instruments, port state officials must carefully consider whether all measures taken are authorized under an agreement or its applicable legislation.

Especially for older vessels, PSCos must ensure the applicability of requirements. The requirements of the new agreements may not apply to existing vessels and, in some cases, vessels may be exempt or have equivalent provisions. Regional members of remote policy will agree to conduct concentrated inspection campaigns from time to time for periods usually three or four months.